Thursday, June 28, 2012

Make Your Own Liquid Soap

Make Your Own Liquid Soap
My family goes through a lot of soap. We particularly go through a lot of castile soap, which makes sense because we use it in practically everything! We use castile soap for our body wash, hand soap, dish soap, shaving, scrubbing, and probably a lot more!


I  would pay about $30 for 64 oz of Dr. Bronners or I could pay about $14 for 64 oz of the knock off brand. Now looking at those numbers, I guess you could say that it doesn’t seem very expensive but that price can add up when you go through soap as often as we do! Besides, why pay that much when you could pay just $4 for 64 oz or even less if you went with a cheaper brand?

Seems like a nice price to pay, doesn’t it? You could save $26 on just 64 oz of soap (if you are making Dr. Bronner’s soap that is. Price would vary depending on what you buy and what you’d compare it to) I can think of plenty of other items I can buy with $26!

How do you get so much soap for so little? Easy! All you need is 1 bar of soap! It doesn’t even have to be castile soap. I just mentioned castile soap because it’s what we have but you can definitely use any of your favorite bar soaps and turn them into liquid soap.

Bar Soap to Liquid Soap

1 - 4 oz bar of soap
Make Your Own Liquid Soap8 cups of water
1 Tbs. vegetable glycerin (optional -see notes below)

Directions
Pour 8 cups of water into a pot and heat until just before boiling. While the water is heating up, grate one bar of soap either by hand or in a food processor. 

Make Your Own Liquid SoapOnce your water is just about to boil, add in the grated soap and stir. Mix until all the soap as dissolved, it will look like soapy water, don't worry it will turn into proper liquid soap. At this point, add in the glycerin if using. Allow mixture to cool for about 12-24 hours. 




Make Your Own Liquid SoapOnce cool it will have thickened. Beat mixture with a electric mixer to fully incorporate. If the mixture seems too thick, you can add more water to thin it out. Pour into containers and you are all set!




Soap Note: Bar soaps vary in size. Dr. Bronner’s soap for instance is 5 oz and because of this I needed to add more water. If you were to do the math, it’s about 2 cups of water per 1 oz of soap. You should be able to use that math, to adjust your recipe if your bar soap is not 4 oz.

Glycerin Note:  I have yet to add glycerin to my soap because so far I do not feel like it's needed it. By adding glycerin to your soap you can make your soap more moisturizing, so if you feel like your soap needs to be a bit more moisturizing then go ahead and add the glycerine!

Frugal Note: If you want to save even more money, double your batch! 2 bars of soap will make 1 gallon (or 16 cups) of soap. Just like you would save money on buying in bulk, so you can save by making in bulk!


35 comments:

  1. Do you get a nice lather? I have tried this with a few different bar soaps but I don't seem to get enough lather to use as body wash. Any tips?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, I think it lathers nicely. In fact, perhaps too much. When I mixed it with my mixer it got and stayed a bit foamy so when we quirt it out of our bottles it's almost like foam...not quite because there's actual soap there too. I think the key is to make sure you use enough soap. My very first batch, I made with someone else's recipe and it was way too much water. You could always start with less water then called for and then add in the water later if needed, to ensure that you get thick enough - sudsy enough soap.

      Delete
  2. This sounds like such an easy way to make a great soap! Is the consistency of the liquid soap the same as the liquid Dr. Bronners?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I would say that when you are using it it feels like Dr. Bronners...but mine at least (and this could be because I needed to add water at the end and then beat it in) is more foamy looking. So when I squirt it out of the bottle, it looks a lot like foam but then you start lathering and it feels the same as Dr. Bronners. It's like the bubbles are hiding the actual soap in my bottles.

      Delete
  3. I keep considering making more products at home so Thanks for the tip!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Does this dry your skin out at all? EVERY THING dries mine out. If so, how would you recommend incorporating a moisturizer?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It doesn't dry our skin out (this is referring to the Dr. Bronners...different soap will of course, give different results) but Dr. Bronners doesn't normally dry our skin out. I would recommend finding a bar soap that is designed to be high moisturizing and use that and then be sure to add in the vegetable glycerin as that helps with moisturizing as well.

      Delete
  5. I'm glad you posted this! I've seen things for making soap like this with other brands and keep thinking about trying it w/ Bronner's, too. My question is this... When we use liquid Bronner's, we dilute it (at least 1 pt soap to 10 parts water - maybe more, I don't actually measure but just know about how much to put in each different pump) - that works great for hand washing, dishes, body wash, etc. So, even though the bottle of soap costs about $14, it goes a long way once diluted. I know that making it with a bar of soap would be cost efficient comparing it to just the bottle, but not sure if it is if I don't then dilute it more when we go to use it, you know? Just curious if you end up diluting it more after you make it? Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Daisy,
      Well I never dilute our Dr Bronners so I think the homemade version is about the same consistency. So I think you'd still want to dilute even the homemade stuff if that is what you are used to.

      Delete
  6. wow, this is so cool! Could i use a packet of pure soap flakes? I'm thinking yes...and I have some lying around somewhere...! Wish I could find castile soap here in Perth.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I don't see why not. You could always order castile soap. I order mine even though I can find it in my stores just because it's cheaper to order it (usually)

      Delete
  7. Did your homemade liquid soap get the consistency of Jello after it sat around? I think it took a month, but it became thick. I followed the recipe to a 'T', but maybe it's because I live in the South and the water/humidity is different. Not sure, but it makes it hard to work with, unlike purchased liquid Bronner's, which always stays liquid.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It can get thicker as it sets up. If this happens and you find it to be an issue then you can just add more water to the mixture. Some soaps seem to "gel" worse then others it seems.

      Delete
  8. I made this today with a bar of the almond! Smells so good! Anyways, I can just put this in a old bodywash container and us it on my loofah? Without dilution or any additives?! How exciting!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, you can just use as is. Depending on how thick your soap came out, you may or may not want to dilute it but it's really just preference at that point.

      Delete
  9. I have black specks in my soap...is this because of the almond soap? Or do I just have weird black specks that somehow started floating around my soap?! Help!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hmm that's strange. I'm not familiar with the almond soap... does it come with black specks? I know that a brand I recently tried has specks of basil in it so that carries over to my soap. There shouldn't be any specks unless it was originally in the bar soap. How long ago did you make it? Did it perhaps mold?

      Delete
    2. I don't remember if it had specks already. I think I have figures it out. I don't have a big enough bowl so I kept it in the pot. Well its Teflon. So when I mixed it maybe I scraped some of the Teflon off?! Ugh :(

      Delete
  10. Just wondered if you use a designated pot for soap making? Is it ok to use something I regularly cook with???

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Tiffany,
      In this case, it's totally ok to use a regular cooking pot. You are really just doing an extra good cleaning job on the pot. :) If you were making soap from scratch (such as when you use lye) then you'd want a designated pot but this recipe is fine for normal cooking pots.

      Delete
  11. Hi,
    I have a question so i didnt wanna make the wrong size. But if I got a gallon of distilled water how many 5oz bronner's soaps would I add to it and how much glycerin? thanks so much!

    Alisha

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Alisha,
      You need 2 cups of water per 1 oz of soap. So 3 Dr Bronner's soaps would need 15 cups of water. As there are 16 cups in a gallon, I would say it's probably safe to do just 3 bars of soap for one gallon. As for the glycerin, you'd want about 2 tbs for a gallon

      Delete
    2. For three 5-oz bars of soap you'd need 30 cups of water, not 15! For one gallon you'd need 8 oz of soap, so two 5-oz bars and measure one of them into 3 oz using a kitchen scale or something.

      Delete
    3. Bah! Yes you are correct beichan! I don't know what I did…think I was originally planning on writing that 3 Dr Bronner's soaps would be 15 oz..and it just got jumbled in my head somewhere…. Yes 15 oz of soap would mean 30 cups of water!

      For one gallon of water, I'd just do a bar and a smidgen more than half of Dr Bronner's soap.

      Delete
  12. AAAAAAAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHH,
    Thanks sosososo much for responding. didnt know if you would or not! I'm about to move out on my own, me and my 2 year old daughter and I want to be as cost effective as possible. Thanks so very much for getting back to me so soon and on the same day at that!

    God Bless,

    Alisha J.

    ReplyDelete
  13. You can get castile soap at www.naturalwayorganics.net. Still does all the same wonders just more affordable and I think it's a lot better.

    ReplyDelete
  14. i'm curious as to how to use this liquid soap... usually dr. b's suggest diluting their liquid soap depending on the use (shampoo, hand soap, APC, etc.) So, is this liquid version already diluted? Or is this liquid version the same exact as when you buy the liquid Dr. B and you have to dilute it further? Please help!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I personally use this "undiluted" but then I also used Dr Bronner's undiluted (I'm an oddball I guess). However, this recipe is almost just like Dr. Bronners. There is a slightly different consistency but it works the same. So if you prefer to dilute Dr Bronners then feel free to dilute this recipe too.

      Delete
  15. I tried making liquid castile soap with the bar of Kirk's Castile soap and I followed another recipe that said to use 1 bar of soap with 6 cups of water. I put it in a glass jar, but a day later it was still very liquidy. It didn't thicken at all. I then heated it up again and added 1 more bar of soap. Another day later it still hasn't thickened. What should I do? I would like a creamy consistency. I appreciate your help!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's very interesting. In theory a Kirk's bar would need 8 oz of water (as it's a 4 oz bar). So the fact that you originally used 6 cups should have made for a very thick soap. Not sure why it wouldn't have thickened. Now as far as thickness goes…it does end up liquid (obviously as it's being turned into a liquid soap) but it's still as thick or a bit thicker than liquid castile soap.

      You might want to give it another try with a different bar soap. I've had good luck with Dr Bronners and Dr Woods. Dr. Woods is currently my favorite and is cheaper than Dr. Bronners.

      Delete
    2. Thank you for responding. Do I put 8oz or 8 cups of water per 4oz bar? I noticed in the recipe above it says 8 cups, but your reply says 8oz. I just want to make sure I do it right. Thank you so much for your advice. Also, where can I find Dr. Woods soap?

      Delete
    3. Oh bother. Yes it's CUPS. 2 cups water per 1 oz of soap. (it's all the talk of oz that always makes me mess up the wording) So for a 4 oz bar of soap it would be 8 cups of water. :)

      You can find Dr Woods at amazon or vitacost. You might be able to find it in health stores but I've never looked.

      Delete
  16. This recipe was great! I made a batch last night and let it cool and just filled all my soap containers. thanks for sharing!

    ReplyDelete
  17. Just wanted to say that mine with Kirks Castile got way too hard to use, but I added a little water and put the jar in a pot filled 1/2 way with water and heated it up a little and it turned back into awesome usable liquid. I dont know if anyone else has had this same thing happen but thats what I did to fix the problem. Otherwise it was too gelled-like to even use.

    ReplyDelete

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...